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Saturday, July 23, 2016

Mary DeVane Took 7 Tory Prisoners into her Home #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers.com

Seven Tory Prisoners Taken at the Home of Mrs. Mary Devane
By Jeannette Holland Austin (Profile)

During the Revolutionary War many Americans served terms of three months, then returned home to plow or harvest crops. Also, they hired substitutes for various reasons. Such was the case of Britain Powell who first enlisted under Colonel James Kenon, Major John Moulton, Captain Shadrack Stallings and Lt. Elijah Bowen during the Spring of 1777/1778 as a Lieutenant Horseman. He rendezvoused at the Duplin County Court House for about two years when his wife became ill and hired Lewis Penear as substitute. Afterwards he volunteered again and was serving under Captains Aaron Williams and H. Holmes when he helped to take seven prisoners at the home of Mrs. Mary Devane on the Black River (New Hanover County). He was in the army of Colonel Hawkins serving as a minuteman during the pursuit of Tories up and down the North East River. Later, joined the regiment of Colonel William Washington of the Continental Line and marched to South Carolina.

Cape Fear River
The Black River is a tributary of the Cape Fear River

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Friday, July 22, 2016

The Chowanoac Indians in NC #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers.com

The Chowanoac Indians
By Jeannette Holland Austin (Profile)

When the Europeans were settling the colonies during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Chowanoac Indians occupied both banks of the Chowan River in Northeastern North Carolina. They spoke the Algonquian language which is said to mean " people at the south." Their villages and lands covered Gates, Hertford, Bertie and Chowan Counties. Their neighbors were the Iroquoian Mongoak (later Tuscarora) to the south and west of Salmon Creek in Bertie County, the Algonquian Weapemeoc were neighbors east of Rockyhock Creek in Chowan County. When Sir Walter Raleigh was colonizing from 1584 to 1590, the Chowanoac were probably the most powerful of the Carolina Algonquians. The Chowanoac took offense to English encroachment during 1666 when and violence broke out upon the settlers occupying the western side of the Chowan River. Eventually, however, as the English continued their settlements, the Chowanoac abandoned their lands west of the river. The Chowanoac were one of the tribes which ignited the rebellion of Nathaniel Bacon in 1676 but who were subdued in 1677. There were less than 200 Indians left and the Chowanoac were placed on a reservation of 12 square miles in Gates County. At the onset of the Tuscarora War of 1711 to 1713, the Chowanoac could muster only fifteen warriors to fight with the English against their historic Iroquoian neighbors to the west. It was during this era that the tribe suffered both at the hands of their enemies as well as the English which prompted the chief (John Hoyter) to petition the colonial government for protection. The result was that the tribe was reduced to six square miles, losing some of its best lands. After about a year they did not have enough people to farm the land and the tribal leaders asked the colonial government to sell 2,050 acres. They continued selling their lands during the next twenty years. By 1751 the tribe had ceased to exist.

Chowanoacindians
Chowanoac Indians.

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Thursday, July 21, 2016

Daniel Fowle Occupied New 40-RoomGovernor's Mansion in Raleigh #northcarolinapioneers.com

North Carolina Executive MansionNorth Carolina Executive Mansion (profile)
By Jeannette Holland Austin


The 40-room North Carolina Executive mansion in Raleigh was designed by Samuel Sloan and was constructed between 1883 and 1891 at its location on 200 North Blount Street in Raleigh. It is said that the red bricks were fashioned by State prisoners and made from native clay. The interior of the mansion features crystal chandeliers, 18th and 19th century furnishings and hand-loomed rugs. The three-storied residence was first occupied by Daniel G. Fowle in 1891. It had a patterned high-hipped roof with steep, intersecting gables, a small rectangular cupola and verandahs and balconies with ornate brackets and trim.

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Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Soldier from Rockiingham County Fought in Battle of Camden #history #northcarolinapioneers.com

Soldier from Rockingham in the Battle of Camden
By Jeannette Holland Austin Profile

The Battle of Camden is remembered in history as a major victory for the British. The day of the battle, August 16, 1780, the British forces commanded by Lieutenant General Charles and Lord Cornwallis routed the American forces of Major General Horatio Gates about five miles North of Camden, South Carolina and in the process strengthened the British hold over the Carolinas. Some thought that the battle was ill planned by the American General Horatio Gates. Nonetheless, it was so bad a defeat for the American forces that Gates never commanded another field battle. Peter Crawford of Rockingham County first entered the war in Mecklenburg County, Virginia during 1781 and joined the 4th Virginia regiment under the command of General Gates. They marched first to Ramsey's Mill where they had a scrimmage with the Tories. They arrived in Camden on August 15, 1780, the evening before the battle. Before Crawford reached Camden he was detailed to take charge of one of the Baggage wagons for the battle. After this battle he rallied and joined the remnant of his Regiment on the Pee Dee river and marched to Hillsborough where he was discharged after a tour of Service of more than five months. The second time that he entered the service it was in the draft of Capt. Thomas Foulk and joined the regiment of Gloucester at an old field near Yorktown. Crawford remained in service until the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

Battle of Camdenbr>British Victory during the Battle of Camden, South Carolina August 16, 1780.

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

The Attack of Fort Fisher NC #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers.com

Fort Fisher
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Fort Fisher

Fort Fisher near Wilmington possessed one of the largest Confederate earthen works forts, with Colonel William Lamb as its commander. In fact, it was Lamb who redesigned the fort similar to the Russian Crimean War fort called Malakoff Tower. It was heavily armed and its earth and sand mound construction readily absorbed bombardment by heavy artillery. In December of 1864, the Union Navy blew up a ship packed with explosive in front of the fort, with slight damage to the fort itself. Determined to close the port of Wilmington to Confederate blockade runners, General Grant ordered a second attack in January of 1865. During January of 1865 Confederate defenders repelled one part of the Union attack on Fort Fisher. However, when Federal units penetrated the defenses of the fort in another sector, they captured the fort. The fall of Fort Fisher closed the part of Wilmington, which was the last fort open to the Confederacy.

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Monday, July 18, 2016

General Thomas Blount of "The Grove" #history #northcarolinapioneers.com


"The Grove"
By Jeannette Holland Austin (Profile)

"The Grove" was built by General Thomas Blount ca 1808 in Tarboro, North Carolina. The Tar River served as a thriving inland port for merchants and farmers.

The Grove

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Sunday, July 17, 2016

Nicholas Longworth - the "Catawba grape" #history #northcarolinapioneers.com

The Catawba Grape
By Jeannette Holland Austin

The origins of the Catawba grape is believed to have been cultivated by native tribes along the river and territory occupied by the Catawba Indians. It is certainly one of the first native American grapes used in wine production and during the early 19th century was a popular grape for the wine industry. The fruit is agreeable to the palate, for jam, jelly or juice. Probably the most remembered is Nicholas Longworth of Cincinnati who founded the first successful winery in America. Longworth purchased Catawba cuttings and planted a vineyard along the Ohio River.

Catawba Grape

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